Friday, July 11, 2008

For his life and his livestock's

This man, Pak Ujang, has some goats and cows in his village, Desa Kapal, at Lembang. Every single day he has to go to forest near his house to take elephant grass for his livestocks. He has to climb Gunung Putri (Princess Hill) to arrive in the area where he can cut some elephant grass and put them on his soldier walking home.

10 comments:

nobu said...

I suppose it is hard work.
But I think It is useful to preserve to enviroment of the forest.

magiceye said...

animals making their 'master' work for their food! tough life!

Jilly said...

What a beautiful photograph and how hard this man's work is.

Thanks so much for visiting Menton DP and Monte Carlo DP. Now I'm glad to have found YOU.

Answering your question, I don't know where the sand comes from in Menton but I'll endeavour to find out one day. Thanks for the visits.

angela said...

That does look like hard work and I should think it's hot too..
Thank you for your visit..

ken mac said...

wow, west java! Thanks for contributing, looking forward to more pics from your world...

flyingstars said...

Indeed these people are very hard working & very few of us realise the real value of their work who does everything quietly...nice photo!

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Chuckeroon said...

Good Morning, Harry!

It's always good to have visitors from Asia-Pacific knocking on Richmond's door.

Your question: originally the houses were built 300 yrs ago for very wealthy people, but now they are almost all converted to offices, or still occupied by very wealthy people. ;-)

Hilda said...

Yes, life in rural areas here in the Philippines is just as hard. But it's still better than if they move to urban centers and can't get jobs and end up homeless and begging. That's one of the biggest problems of Metro Manila.

sam said...

wow, now i feel really bad for compaining yesterday that I hate the hassle of having to go to the supermarket for groceries!

Lessie said...

Great photo -- and your commentary gives me a "second" view of the man and his work. Very thoughtful.